Learn you will, if you shall seek knowledge. An archetypical mother, a traitor, and a boy trying to find himself, encounter you will on this path. Understand? Do or do not. There is no try.

Here, I present you with the next selection of Lucy’s LitGloss! 🙂

Anastrophe-blog

Anastrophe
Inverses the normal order of sentences this rhetorical device does.
• Famous users: many poets and Yoda. See what happens when Shakespeare meets Yoda:
“Thy father, indeed./Powerful Jedi was he./Poweful Jedi.”
“Nay, nay! Try thou not./ But do thou or do though not,/For there is no ‘try.’”
(William Shakespeare’s The Empire Striketh Back by Ian Doescher)

Yoda

Mrs_Bennet_shorter

Mrs. Bennett
We encounter a gamut of motherly archetypes throughout literature. There’s the evil stepmother, the mother-of-your-dreams you never got to know, the fairy godmother… and then there’s Mrs. Bennett. The opening sentence of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice summarizes her life’s mission:

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

She is definitely one meddling mom. Mrs. Bennett goes through hell and high waters to match her daughters with worthy gentlemen; their worthiness based on her own standards, of course.

Bildungsroman_shorter

Bildungsroman
Bildung (education/cultivation) + roman (novel)= Bildungsroman A German term used on novels that trace the development of its main character from naivety to maturity a.k.a. a coming-of-age story. This development usually involves going to school, but we all know one can get ‘schooled’ outside the classroom.

Bildungsroman through the years:
Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship by Goethe (1796)
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens (1861)
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger (1951)
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chobsky (1999)
Never Let Me Go by Kazhuo Ishiguro (2005)

brutus_shorter

Brutus
Confidant and adviser turned assassin– Caesar never saw that coming, especially from Brutus. The shock resounds in his last words: “Et tu, Brute?” (“You too, Brutus?”). After all, stabbing your friend’s back (or literally stabbing your friend in public) is a very un-Romanly thing to do. Those many years and campaigns in the Senate together go down the drain with one blow. What a brute-us!

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